Floodlight Cam Mounting

They won’t fix this issue just like they won’t make or allow glass break sensors to work with their alarm system. It makes no sense.

Hi is it possible for you to take a picture of your floodlight, I just would like to see how you attached it to your ceiling ? Thanks a million if you can. I want to buy one of these but I want to make sure I can mount it first

If I remember correctly, I had to turn the lights around completely so the sun shields would be on top. Everything works rather well, with a couple of caveats…

  1. You’ll have to tweak the motion settings several times to get them where you want. What’s on the screen doesn’t necessarily show what is needed.

  2. Because the light/cam is under an eave, the light sensor is delayed until the sun is fully shining in the morning. So you’ll see the lights come on when they really don’t need to, but only first thing in the morning.

Yes, as you can see, it can be done, but Ring should make adjustments to the mounting or come out with a different mounting setup for eave/ceiling mount, even if they have to sell it separately. Countless numbers of Ring customers have asked for a fix for this, but they seem to be keeping their fingers in their ears.

Hope the photo helps.

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I found that as long as my soffit is high enough (mine is about 10’) then they work fine mounted to the soffit even without modifying the pivot for the camera. I think the only time it is an issue is if your soffit is 10’ and you really want to have the camera pivoted high enough to get a lot of distance.

But it is ridiculous that Ring won’t fix this. I don’t know of any houses that have floodlights mounted on the wall. I’m sure they are out there, but my father’s house built in 1972, my first house built in 2000 and my current house built in 1994 along with all houses of anyone I have ever asked have floodlights that mount on the soffit.

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That photo really helps; thank you!

I should have checked into this before dropping nearly ~$1,000 (so far) on a Ring security system, 2 doorbells, 2 stick up cams, and some spotlight cams. :angry: I was planning to get (4) floodlight cams today (Friday) and install them over the weekend. Now I need to do more homework to see if they’ll mount the way I want them to.

I was looking around the Ring site, and every photo they have shows a “vertical” mount (as in on a wall)

I didn’t see any photos from Ring showing the floodlight cam mounted under the eaves–which blows my mind, because every security light or floodlight I’ve ever had, or seen on other houses, is mounted under the eaves. (Unless the house came with some wall-mounted lights, most people aren’t going to drill into brick, stucco, vinyl, whatever, and try running a power supply through a wall!)

I’m hoping I can do more research to CONFIRM I’ll be able to install Ring Floodlight cams “horizontally” under my eaves. I want to get (4) of them, so not a small investment.

@lemmy999 wrote:

But it is ridiculous that Ring won’t fix this. I don’t know of any houses that have floodlights mounted on the wall. I’m sure they are out there, but my father’s house built in 1972, my first house built in 2000 and my current house built in 1994 along with all houses of anyone I have ever asked have floodlights that mount on the soffit.

I know! That’s what I’m saying, too! Every house I’ve lived in or owned has had floodlights on the soffit or the “eaves”.

When the home builder has run the 110v line to the corners of a house, it’s silly-easy for a homeowner to get up on a ladder and changeout a floodlight…

When Ring designs a floodlight that, apparently, is only made for vertical (wall) mounting, that’s a problem.

I need 4 floodlight cams for the corners of my house. I was planning on using the existing wiring. I have no existing wiring inside a wall anywhere near the corners of my house. And I’m not going to try and cut into the stucco and find a wire! No way. (And I’m not going to hire a contractor to install a floodlight that should take about ~15 minutes for me to install myself.) :confounded:

At least the one guy up above has a photo showing he mounted it horizontally on his eave. That gives me hope. Too bad it seems different Ring support people have different answers.

@DalTxJim wrote:

If I remember correctly, I had to turn the lights around completely so the sun shields would be on top. Everything works rather well, with a couple of caveats…

  1. You’ll have to tweak the motion settings several times to get them where you want. What’s on the screen doesn’t necessarily show what is needed.

  2. Because the light/cam is under an eave, the light sensor is delayed until the sun is fully shining in the morning. So you’ll see the lights come on when they really don’t need to, but only first thing in the morning.

Yes, as you can see, it can be done, but Ring should make adjustments to the mounting or come out with a different mounting setup for eave/ceiling mount, even if they have to sell it separately. Countless numbers of Ring customers have asked for a fix for this, but they seem to be keeping their fingers in their ears.

Hope the photo helps.

I just installed the first of several Floodlight cams, horizontally (under the eave) and this post is totally correct.

No need to dremel out any of the ball/socket joints on the camera. If you’ve ever insalled a floodlight before, it’s just as easy.

Loosen up the “arms” where the lights and the camera connect to the housing, and turn them as needed. To get the motion sensor portion completely horizontal (as per the instructions) the camera’s “ball and socket” joint is at its very extreme range of motion. But it works well and my motion sensing seems to be a full 140° (as Ring advertises, but perhaps even more; approaching 180°) which was much better than the standard floodlight I removed.

You CAN tell Ring designed this to be mounted on a wall (vertically), but I doubt they’d go to the trouble of a redesign to make it ‘easier’ to mount horizontally under an eave or soffit. I’d imagine the only redesign Ring would make to the Floodlight cam is when they come up with a new camera hardware version. This seems to share the basic design of the “Spotlight Cam” (with the addition of 2 LED floodlights, of course)

Here’s a possible solution that I feel Ring could provide more easily than re-engineering the existing floodlight. I bought an inclined ceiling mount for my setup. I think they are typically used in security camera mounting. It’s a bit pricy but it’s solid metal and I feel it will give me the extra flexibility so I don’t resort to hacking on the device.

I’ve seen plastic wedges for adjustment of the doorbells. It seems reasonable they could offer a round plastic mount, similar to this for horizontally mounted floodlights.

Curious how this worked out for you? We are thinking of doing the same we have the same issue with the angled soffit install.

I bought a DS-1281ZJ-S Inclined Ceiling Mount and a 4 Inches Diameter Universal Light Fixture Crossbar on Amazon. I had no issue with replacing the existing soffit dumb flood flight and using these to mount the Ring flood light with an angle. Positioning is fine for motion at the end of the driveway, which could fit two midsize trucks end to end. I’m happy with the result.

Can you post a picture of this?

There is a mount designed to allow for eave/soffit mounting

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