2nd generation doorbell - does it need a resistor?

The help centre article for the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell (see table in the link below says: “ resistor not needed when hardwiring"

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-gb/articles/360045514872-The-difference-between-the-Ring-Video-Doorbell-1st-generation-and-Ring-Video-Doorbell-2nd-generation-

However the instruction manual for the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell (see attached) says at the bottom right on page 13

“If wiring directly to a doorbell transformer, connect a 25 ohm, 50W wirewound resistor in series with one of the doorbell wires to protect your Video Doorbell.”

So which is correct? Does the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell need a resistor when hardwired, or not?

@petery wrote:

The help centre article for the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell (see table in the link below says: “ resistor not needed when hardwiring"

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-gb/articles/360045514872-The-difference-between-the-Ring-Video-Doorbell-1st-generation-and-Ring-Video-Doorbell-2nd-generation-

However the instruction manual for the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell (see attached) says at the bottom right on page 13

“If wiring directly to a doorbell transformer, connect a 25 ohm, 50W wirewound resistor in series with one of the doorbell wires to protect your Video Doorbell.”

So which is correct? Does the 2nd generation Ring video doorbell need a resistor when hardwired, or not?

Hello @petery ,

BOTH statements are correct. The key is that when Ring refers to “Hardwiring”, they mean you are connecting to the pre-existing wires that are from your pre-existing house’s indoor wall-mounted chime and the house transformer. The house-bell chime provides electrical resistance to the current.

IF you do not have a pre-existing house-bell-chime, but you desire the benefit of the “trickle-charge”, you can attach a transformer directly (without a pre-existing doorbell) to the Ring Video Doorbell “2nd Gen/2020 Release” but then you need the resistor (since you do not have a house-bell chime that would have provided the electrical current resistance).

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-gb/articles/360044324232-How-to-Connect-Your-Ring-Video-Doorbell-2nd-generation-directly-to-a-low-voltage-transformer-without-a-pre-existing-doorbell

Yes, I can understand your confusion about how Ring uses the term “Hardwired.” Yeah, technically that with or without a physical house-bell, in both cases there are wires physically attached to your doorbell. But when Ring says “hardwired” they mean to the house-bell wires already installed in your house. That is different than a house not having these wires and you are directly attaching to JUST a transformer. Then a resistor is needed as a substitute for the absence of the house-bell chime, for your “2nd Gen/2020 Release”.

Adding to the confusion is that the new Ring Video Doorbell 3 and the “3 Plus” do not need this resistor when directly wiring to a transformer (without pre-existing house-bell chime), due to new internal configuration. Here is a summary for directly wiring a Video Doorbell to a transformer (WITHOUT using a a pre-existing house bell-chime):

  • Model “Ring Video Doorbell (1st Gen)” does need a Resistor for Fire Hazard.
  • Model “Ring Video Doorbell 2” does need a Resistor for Fire Hazard.
    • Note: the “Video Doorbell 2” is a discontinued different model than the new “Video Doorbell 2nd Gen/2020 Release.” These two different doorbells are often confused in many posts.
  • Model “Ring Video Doorbell 2nd Gen/2020 Release” does need a Resistor to work successfully.
  • Model “Ring Video Doorbell 3” does NOT need a Resistor.
  • Model “Ring Video Doorbell 3 Plus” does NOT need a Resistor.

I hope this helps clear up “to resistor, or not to resistor” issue. :slight_smile:

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