Connecting AC adapter to Ring Video Doorbell

I have connected my ring video doorbell (gen 1) to an AC adapter which from memory, puts out 18V and 500mA. I’ll attached a photo of the specs.
Before I close up the cladding I would like to know how to tell if the AC power source is working if the doorbell actually always used battery and the only the battery icon is displayed.

Choose Filed not working to upload images…

@anoniimous wrote:
I have connected my ring video doorbell (gen 1) to an AC adapter which from memory, puts out 18V and 500mA. I’ll attached a photo of the specs.
Before I close up the cladding I would like to know how to tell if the AC power source is working if the doorbell actually always used battery and the only the battery icon is displayed.

@anoniimous , Just to double check, you did connect a Wire-wound resistor too?? If not, it is going to get really hot really fast!

Instructions with diagrams on how to set up the transformer for a Ring Video Doorbell:

https://support.ring.com/hc/en-us/articles/205180710-How-to-Connect-Your-Ring-Video-Doorbell-Directly-to-a-Low-Voltage-Transformer-Without-a-Pre-existing-Doorbell-

The $10 electrical Resistor (because there is no house chime bell to provide the resistance):

https://shop.ring.com/products/wirewound-resistor?_pos=4&_sid=c9d10599b&_ss=r

One of many choices ($18) for a low voltage 8-24V AC transformer (40V maximum) at 50/60Hz:

https://www.amazon.com/Doorbell-Transformer-800mA-Adapter-Compatible/dp/B07PJHVJ2T/ref=sr_1_7?crid=3CVLWWIIJVLSZ&dchild=1&keywords=doorbell+transformer+16-24+vac&qid=1598189059&sprefix=doorbell+transformer%2Caps%2C180&sr=8-7

Then change your setting in the Doorbell “Power Source” from “Battery” to “Hardwired.” All Ring Doorbell are actually Battery-Powered (except the Ring Pro) and the hardwire connection provides a “trickle-charge” only to replenish the battery (the doorbell cannot run off the hardwire).

Then, to tell if the AC power source is “trickle-charging”, go to the Doorbell setting page, and in the upper-right-corner you should see the Battery Icon with a lightening-bolt in it. If the lightening-bolt is not in the Battery Icon, then your hardwired is NOT trickle-charging, even if the wires are connected. Also, look at Doorbell’s “Device Health” page and it should now have “Power Source” as “Hardwired” which means it is “Trickle-Charge” enabled. It is also not uncommon to see the battery’s power level drop under frequent demand situations, and later the wired “trickle-charge” will be able to restore the battery back to 100% level gradually when demand decreases. Also, if you do not see the lightening-bolt or the word “Hardwired”, then your battery will not charge, even if the hard-wires are physically connected.

I hope you find this information useful :slight_smile:

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Hi Boon.
It’s certainly the detailed information I have been looking for. I thought the diode wasn’t required for a simple adapter. But if you say it is, I’ll give it a go. And then check out the rest of your advice

Hi again Boon.
I remembered and found a diode included in the retail box and I also recall once seeing a DIY video showing how to connect it between the terminals and if necessary, reversing the polarity…
This is clearly different but does the same job?

@anoniimous wrote:
Hi Boon.
It’s certainly the detailed information I have been looking for. I thought the diode wasn’t required for a simple adapter. But if you say it is, I’ll give it a go. And then check out the rest of your advice

Oh . . . You misunderstood. Do NOT use the diode. The diode is used to make certain wall-mounted house bells function correctly. Since you do not have any bells (bell unit that would provide current resistance), you need to substitute in a electrical RESISTOR to prevent burning up. Without a Resistor, it’s like having a direct electrical short . . . HOT STUFF! Double check the instructions. I hope you find this helpful. :slight_smile: :slight_smile:

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Got it. I’ll order a resistor.
But in anticipation does the power source setting only appear once the power source is connected? I ask because presently I can’t see or going the setting.
Is it under devices then the doorbell and general settings?

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@anoniimous wrote:
Got it. I’ll order a resistor.
But in anticipation does the power source setting only appear once the power source is connected? I ask because presently I can’t see or going the setting.
Is it under devices then the doorbell and general settings?

:slight_smile: Good good, yes, you’ll have to purchase the $10 resistor. :slight_smile:

After the wire power is attached and plugged in, it should appear Hardwire . . .

 Main menu \> Devices \> select doorbell \> and you should see the lightening bolt in upper-right-corner, then select Device Health \> see that Power Source should display Hardwire. 

If not, you might have to tap the reset button, to set it up again, If it still does not appear, you might have to do a Hard factor reset by holding the reset button for 30-seconds and release, and then it should enter a set-up again. Both a regular set-up and a hard reset set-up are best done, if possible close to the Wi-Fi router whenever possible). :slight_smile:

If you don’t see the lightening bolt and Hardware, you might

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@Boone
Thank you for your reply posts. Much appreciated. I’ll purchase the resistor although in Australia Ring charges $20 with postage… So probably I’ll probably buy an aftermarket one on eBay with same ratings. And then follow your the remainder of your advice.
I finally got this reply where I first posted but until today, never got a reply. What do you make about the claim?
My Ring is well out warranty anyway and TBH if or when it fails I wouldn’t mind replacing it with a device which does the same thing but for much less and is able to save recirdings to my LAN.
When I bought the Ring this limitation was not clear. I thought I would be able to record to my LAN. I was and remain displeased about the fact that a subscription is necessary to save recordings. What’s more because as I understand it, motion and doorbell alerts are first sent to and then received from US based servers, alerts in Australia can sometimes be received with significant delays… For instance, by the time I receive the notification, sometimes I see a courier at the top of my drive already leaving, having just drop left a package at my door and pressing the doorbell… ?

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@anoniimous ,

You’re welcome. My pleasure.

In Australia? Ahhhhhhhhh. Yes, this at A$15:

https://au-en.ring.com/collections/accessories/products/wirewound-resistor

An aftermarket “Wire-wound Resistor” (rated at 25 OHM and 50 Watts) or Transformer (rated at 8-24 Volts AC /40Volts maximum at 50/60Hz) will work , but it is possible what Tom_Ring said about 3rd party non-Ring equipment, and how doing that might possibly void your Ring warranty.

Cost, Performance, and Warranty are all factors to consider. But, that’s your personal decision. And it sounds like you’ve already owned this doorbell for awhile (where Cost & Performance factors override concerns about the warranty).

I don’t know anything about how, or if, the motion and doorbell alerts are first sent to and then received from US based servers. But I can understand your frustration if alerts are received with significant delays. Here sometimes, we too can have delays, but it’s more related to which Mobile-carrier company we are using. Even the choice of device (Android or iPhone) can make a difference My spouse and I both use the same Mobile-carrier company on the same contract, and yet her iPhone is always 3-seconds faster receiving alerts than my Android.

Enjoy the remaining of your cooler winter temperatures “down under”, as we summer sweat up here. Take care. :slight_smile:

Thank you.
Yes. It’s well out of warranty so less concerned about that.
Sure I appreciate the mobile network is one thing. However the delay I’m referring to and mostly experience is the delay between pressing the doorbell and a Chime device sounding…
Anyway. Thanks for your posts and wishes…

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